Flashback Recipe: Simple but Delicious Carrot-Beet Marinara Sauce

This is from one of my 2016 cooking demos remains a favorite way of mine to get a good dose of beets and carrots or a go-to when I am cooking for someone who does not eat tomatoes. Or if I don’t have good tomatoes – think mid-winter for that situation! Based on a recipe by macrobiotic chef and author Kristina Turner, you will find a link to her cookbook, and to the page with her original recipe, as well as the version I put together in an hour at the market kitchen tent in October 2016 by Clicking HERE.

Cooking Demo Recipe by Wendy Dennis, also author of Culinaryq.com

Flashback Recipe: Quick and Easy Fresh Vegetable Soup

This and some water is all you need!

Last year at this time of year I created a really easy and tasty soup recipe during the market day cooking demo, one that does not need premade/bought vegetable stock, which is helpful if your cupboard, fridge, or freezer is bare in that department. Click the link below and read all about it!

London Broil: Great to grill if a shoulder steak!

Last week, I was looking around the Lilac Hedge Farm Shop Now page and noticed that they are currently offering a cut of beef called London Broil for 11.99 a pound, a bargain for delicious, high quality, pasture-raised beef. But, I wondered whether it could be tossed on the grill without being marinated.

The short answer is YES if it is a shoulder steak cut, albeit you will need to take a few prep steps first. Just defrost it, then cover it it a generous dose of salt, (I used between 1-2 teaspoons of kosher salt for a one-pound steak) let it sit uncovered in the fridge for several hours, (I let mine sit for eight) then on the counter for 30-60 minutes too come to room temperature, then grill as you usually grill a steak.

The caveat is that the name London Broil can mean any number of cheaper, more tough steaks. If you can determine it is a shoulder steak, go for it! If another cut, such as from the round, you will be better off marinating it before grilling, or use use a recipe that calls for braising. Although, I will probably try the above-technique on a round cut one of these days, just to be sure. But, Farmer Ryan says that the London Broil steaks are currently being cut from the shoulder, so you can grill away if you have planning time for defrosting, salting, and bringing to room temperature before cooking.

Otherwise, any cut labeled London Broil will be super to use in any recipe calling for tenderizing with marinating or pounding, and braising is always a great option for tougher cuts of meat.

But, as of my writing this, the London Broil from Lilac Hedge Farm is from the shoulder. So, If you want a really tasty steak with a satisfying texture that is a bit easier on the budget than steaks that need no prep or planning, give their London Broil a try!

Flashback Recipe: Bitter Melon Sauté with Onion, Tomato, Corn, and Thai Basil

We have new Flats Mentor Farm farmers, but lots of the same wonderful Asian produce! Since we can’t have live cooking demos, I thought that, while taking a break from doing home videos in their stead, I’d highlight recipes from past years that use produce available this year.

Click HERE to see what I came up with for a live demo at the market way back in September 2016!

By the way, I didn’t share this in the original post, but this recipe got the stamp of approval of James and Fong’s Mom, who often helped them at the market. 🙂

Broccoli Spigarello: A Great Green All Around

This is SO GOOD! Upon seeing broccoli spigarello listed on Farmer Dave’s Wakefield Farmers Market pre-order page last week, I thought “What is THAT?” Well, now I know and it is my new favorite green. Tasty raw in a mixed greens salad, and perfect for soups, casseroles, and whatever needs more green in it, it shines when sautéed in olive oil, first with some salt, and then with garlic and hot pepper flakes added at the end of cooking before serving with a sprinkle of balsamic or apple cider (or your favorite) vinegar. You need to try this!

You can watch my cooking demo video HERE. And see the WFM Playlist for all this years demos.

This recipe and commentary, below, is verbatim from:
https://www.latimes.com/recipe/spigarello-sauteed-italian-style

Spigarello sautéed Italian style

To prepare spigarello, first pull the leaves from the stems, much as you would strip the needles off a stem of rosemary. Then cook the leaves as you would other leafy greens such as chard, kale or … broccoli rabe.

Blanched and sauteed with olive oil and garlic in the Italian style, spigarello’s leaves, which are slightly firmer than mustard greens yet more delicate than kale, get nice and crisp around the edges.

The ingredients. Simply delicious!
  • 2 bunches of spigarello
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced (about 2 tablespoons)
  • Pinch red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon good balsamic or apple cider vinegar

Wash the spigarello thoroughly. Pull the leaves off the stems, grabbing the leaves from the top of the stem and pulling toward the bottom to remove (in the same way you’d strip rosemary needles). Discard the stems. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the spigarello, return to a boil and blanch for 3 to 5 minutes, until the greens wilt slightly and bend easily in the pan. Drain in a colander.

Heat the olive oil in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add the spigarello, season with salt and sauté until slightly crispy, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and red pepper flakes, turn off the heat and let stand for about 1 minute, stirring often. (If the pan is too thin to hold much heat, cook over low heat for 1 minute after adding the garlic and pepper flakes.) Sprinkle with vinegar and toss lightly. Serve warm.